Motor Competition

Earlier this week, I posted on FB and Twitter that I was considering making a fool of myself at a Motor Competition. To that end, I emailed On High and was called in to have a chat with the new PTB (Powers That Be for you noobs out there).

Ordinarily, a summons to the Office calls for a fair amount of memory searching for whose rights have recently been violated. In this case, however, I knew it was going to be a productive conversation. And I was right. Again. Truly, it’s exhausting. (I’m being sarcastic, people. Lighten up, wouldja?)
At any rate, it appears your old buddy, MC, needs to work on the verbiage of his electronic mail correspondence because I got a lesson in liability. Let me say that I don’t have a political nor a liability conscience bone in my body. Hell, I probably just screwed the pooch writing that. Regardless, in my email I mentioned that it had been some time since my partner and I had practiced cone patterns and this competition could be a good opportunity to “knock the rust off” as it were.
By “knock the rust off”, it seems PTB read it as “break something critical in my body that allows me to be a productive Motor Officer”. And, rightly so. That’s why PTB makes more scratch than me. By now, you’re probably wondering where the positivity I promised is hiding. Well, my impatient friends, PTB and I agreed that we should indeed attend the competition; however, this year it will be as a spectator. I’ll be able to get a feel for what it entails. Add to that, PTB gave us the thumbs up to find an appropriate spot to set up the same patterns and practice on a much more frequent basis.
Long story short, simply asking for something (you know…showing some interest in what you do and how to improve at it) turned out to be beneficial. PTB neither wanted us injured due to lack of practice nor did he want a bad showing at a competition. PTB prefers we prepare for it and win it.
Lofty goal, that. I will say, however, that preparing for a competition will only serve to make myself and my partner better riders and more prepared to do the things we may be called to do in an emergency situation.
Sounds like a win-win to me.
If you’re interested in attending the competition, you can check out the link here. It’s free to the public. Who knows…maybe you’ll run into yours truly. Unless of course I’m wearing my cowl (as it were)…then you just may walk right on by me.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic. Snark is encouraged. Being a prat is not.

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6 thoughts on “Motor Competition

  1. That looks awesome. I had a rough time with the box section of a standard motorcycle licensing test (on a tiny little Honda Rebel 250), and was amazed to watch my instructor whip through it on his Goldwing. This looks a couple orders of magnitude more awesome. Too bad I'm a bit far away to attend. Hm, I wonder if there's a local version…

  2. I served as a judge this year at the Mid-Atlantic Police Motorcycle Competition, held in September in Gaithersburg, Maryland. I was impressed by the skills of the competitors — some 147 of them.

    I figure your competition is like this one, with awards for categories such as "novice" or "experienced" which are not equated to the number of years you have been riding as a motor officer, but the number of times you have entered the competition.

    In any event, it's great fun to observe, and as a experienced rider (but not a cop), I learned a lot.

    I agree, also, with your PTB suggesting that you practice before competing. It was obvious to me that those who practiced did much better than those who did not, and it was easy to tell who didn't.

    Enjoy! Thanks for sharing — and perhaps some day we'll see photos of you on your blog in the competition.

  3. Hey MC! It's great that you are looking at spinning the rubber through the cones. I love getting on the motor to do that…sadly, competitions are the only time I get to ride anymore. The rodeo's sharpen the skills, create muscle memory for the tight situations and build so much confidence in what your motor can do.
    I hope we can meet on the pavement soon surrounded by cones.
    Maybe a little North/South friendly????