Jersey Home Invasion

Last week, I was surfing about on the book of faces when I saw a post by Kelly Grayson, Medic Extraordinaire.  I clicked through to his post and was further enticed to click on a blog called Gun Nuts.

I enjoy a good 2nd Amendment as much as the next guy, but I don’t think I’m a nut.  At any rate, the post’s author, Tim, posted the video you will see below and had some excellent points to make about this kind of incident.  Do yourself a favor and read his post.

**Warning**

The video that follows is graphic and depicts a man putting a beating on a truly unarmed, defenseless woman while her three-year-old watches.

 

Now, we have to make quite a few assumptions about the incident itself as we are only shown snippets of detail.  For example, we have no idea how the suspect gained entry (ruse, straight door kick, etc.).  We have no idea what, if any, conversation took place.

What we are left with is simply a brutal beating.

Tim argues that a firearm could have leveled the playing field and I don’t disagree; however, I will add the caveat that planning for this kind of disaster is important.

When I was a kid, we’d have fire drills in my house.  Come on, my Dad was a firefighter.  Sadly, in this day and age, it seems  it’s more likely to be a victim of a home invasion than to have one’s home catch fire.  I certainly don’t advocate leaving firearms willy nilly around the house for three-year-olds to get their grubby little mitts on, but having a plan of what to do if someone kicks your door in isn’t a bad idea.

If the opportunity to make it to a firearm presents itself, it behooves a homeowner to get to it and handle business if appropriate.  How do you decide what may be appropriate based on the circumstances that arise?  That’s where training comes in.

The Wife and I have a standing agreement that when/if we are out and about and “Cop Mode” is required, she will do whatever it is I tell her to without question and with alacrity.

Could the woman in the video have done anything different?  I have no idea, but it doesn’t appear that way.  It appears to me like she was just trying to protect her daughter.  Could a plan have assisted her?  It couldn’t hurt.  Unfortunately, sometimes shitty things just happen.  As of the writing of the two posts I referenced earlier, the suspect had not been located.

Not so today.  42-year-old Shawn Custis is in custody and facing a number of charges including attempted murder, robbery and endangering the welfare of a child.

Enjoy prison, asshole.

Do you have a plan for a potential crime-related tragedy with your family? 

 

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic. Snark is encouraged. Being a prat is not.

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19 thoughts on “Jersey Home Invasion

  1. I saw that video and it made me sick to my stomach. And I know that woman feared more for her kids than herself. I won’t allow a gun in my house because in a situation like that, she has kids and what is she going to say, “hold on. Let me get my gun from the lockbox upstairs.” No. What I do have is a German Shepherd who is protective of his family. I understand he kicked in the door and I can guarantee my dog would know this before I had time to react. Come on in, asshole. FYI it’s gonna hurt when he uses you as a chew toy.

  2. Good. Hopefully it will make it easier to throw THE WHOLE FREAKIN BOOK at this scum bag.

  3. Why does this surprise you? How many times have you caught someone in a obvious lie, shown them the evidence to prove they are lying, and they still lie to you.

  4. I would be curious to look through statistics regarding home fires versus residential break in (home invasion) but I don’t think the latter is tracked as a separate crime. No?

    • Not sure I understand the “separate crime” bit. A residential burglary and a home invasion (aka robbery) are two very distinct crimes. Is that what you meant?

    • More than likely it depends on your particular locale. Some locations have a specific statute for the crime of home invasion, while others do not.

      Here “home invasion” would fall under aggravated burglary (which is defined as without authority entering into or remaining in any building, manufactured home, mobile home, tent or other structure, or any vehicle, aircraft, watercraft, railroad car or other means of conveyance of persons or property in which there is a human being with intent to commit a felony, theft, or sexually motivated crime therein).

      So in such an incident you would charge a suspect with aggravated burglary plus any additional crimes that they commit during the incident. Had this incident occurred in my area, the POS would get charged with aggravated burglary, aggravated battery, endangerment of a child and most likely criminal damage to property. I’m sure that if I had specific details past just the video, I may be able to come up with more charges.

      In effect, that would be 4 four separate crimes resulting from a single incident.

  5. Also, wearing a gun in your home sends a hell of a message to your children: “Oh, it’s OK honey. It’s just not safe to live here, that’s all.”

  6. I’m a gun owner the wife of a LEO, if this woman had a gun who’s to say she wouldn’t be dead because he got the gun and killed her? However I don’t get not fighting back at all by any means , as a mother I would fight till my last breath her beating may not have been so bad had she attempted to fight back. Her general demeanor in not trying in anyway to defend herself tells me she likely wouldn’t have used a weapon if she had one. I agree in having a plan but as a LEO you know the reason cops react to these sitituations is because of training , a lot and often ,something a housewife isn’t going to do.

  7. I have fire extinguishers placed strategically around the house- one by the front door, one in the kitchen, and one on either side of my bed. Only the one in the kitchen is there to fight fires. The others are an area denial/obscurant/asphyxiation/blunt force weapon. As far as I know, no kid has ever died messing around with a fire extinguisher (although I can imagine a scenario where it could happen.) When you are attacked at home, the attacker usually has the upper hand- he has planned in advance, and has picked a time when you are most vulnerable. But a sudden blast of monoammonium phosphate takes away the initiative and evens the odds. It burns the lungs, makes it hard to see, and, since the last thing in the world the bad guy is expecting is a blast of grainy irritation, may even turn the tables and give those precious seconds to wake up from a deep sleep and mount an effective counteroffensive. And when the powder is used up, connecting forehead to metal canister gets the job done.

    The most likely result, after a blast of chemical extinguisher, is for the attacker, who is suddenly no longer in control, to turn around and run. There is an added benefit of the dirtbag being covered in a fine white powder that is difficult to quickly remove, making that “in-field show” a snap!

    • And Check this out:

      Mono-ammonium phosphate

      Ingestion: Minimal hazard under normal conditions and use. Ingestion of large quantities may cause gastrointestinal discomfort, vomiting, weakness or other medically related problems.

      Inhalation: Dusty conditions may cause mechanical aggravation to respiratory mucous membranes.

      Eye Contact: Dust from this product may cause particulate discomfort to eyes.

      Skin Absorption: Not normally absorbed through the skin.

      Skin Contact: Slight dermal abrasion is possible with prolonged contact, especially around cuffs and collars.

      Effects of Overdose: Ingestion of large doses may cause diarrhea, nausea, abdominal cramps or formation of methemoglobinemia. Seek medical attention.

  8. I have fire extinguishers placed strategically around the house- one around the living room, one in the kitchen, and two in the bedrooms. Only the one in the kitchen is there to fight fires. The others are an area denial/obscurant/asphyxiation/blunt force weapon. As far as I know, no kid has ever died messing around with a fire extinguisher (although I can imagine a scenario where it could happen.) When you are attacked at home, the attacker usually has the upper hand- he has planned in advance, and has picked a time when you are most vulnerable. But a sudden blast of monoammonium phosphate takes away the initiative and evens the odds. It burns the lungs, makes it hard to see, and, since the last thing in the world the bad guy is expecting is a blast of grainy irritation, may even turn the tables and give those precious seconds to wake up from a deep sleep and mount an effective counteroffensive. And when the powder is used up, connecting forehead to metal canister gets the job done.

    The most likely result, after a blast of chemical extinguisher, is for the attacker, who is suddenly no longer in control, to turn around and run. There is an added benefit of the dirtbag being covered in a fine white powder that is difficult to quickly remove, making that “in-field show” a snap!

  9. I was robbed in a home invasion. I was in the bathtub and the guy dragged me out by my neck. I’ve heard ‘too bad you didn’t have a gun!’ from nearly every person who knows of my robbery, but I’m really not so sure – would a firearm be a good idea in the bathroom, in my slippery panicked hands? I honestly have no idea what could have prevented my robbery – gated neighborhood, locked doors, curtains drawn, lights on and tv on, the guy threw a paver through the sliding glass door. I screamed at the unexpected noise and he came right for me. Sometimes bad people do shitty things and I’m at a loss as to how to avoid all of them. Maybe martial arts.